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 Cats by Lilly, paintings and drawings 

 by Lilly Antoneavic 

The Budgeon's display case - Richmond Library Foyer

415 Church Street, Richmond (Melbourne)

2 August to 1 November 2019

Review by Ev Hales


Lilly's fascination for cats is obvious. In this collection of works she explores several aspects of her feline friends. Although small in number (just 12 on display), Lilly presents a range of design, media and style.

She is working with acrylics, oils, watercolour, coloured pencil and ink.

Wild and domestic cats in Lilly’s display

Eye of The Tiger, acrylic on canvas paper, 41cm X 25cm, by Lilly Antoneavic

As to the style, realist and a varied selection of accents like several pieces where the eyes are almost the total focus sand in these it is not hard to become mesmerised by the unflinching stare that only cats can produce. Then there are camouflaged leopards merging into the foliage, cats in a still life type setting as well as single animals without background support. Lilly's skill is seen in her painting of the fur, where you believe you can 'feel' the softness. The eyes have solid form but skilful blending of colour.

Puma Stare, acrylic on canvas paper, 41cm X 27cm, by Lilly Antoneavic

Samantha 1, acrylic on canvas paper, 42 x 30 cm, by Lilly Antoneavic

I particularly responded to the two paintings that were cats set in a background. The Siamese and Flowers, an oil painting on canvas paper, is a beautiful design where the cat's dark markings make abstract patterns in the design. The flowers and glass case are beautifully painted. A delightful work.

Siamese and Flowers, oil on canvas paper, 42 x 30 cm, by Lilly Antoneavic

Samantha 2, acrylic on canvas paper, 42 x 30 cm, by Lilly Antoneavic

Leopard King, this time a watercolour and ink on paper, has the leopard in a leafy setting and the play is on pattern and texture.

If you like cats you will enjoy this selection of images displayed at the Library in Richmond.

Leopard King, watercolour & ink on Arches paper, 41cm X 27cm, by Lilly Antoneavic

Lilly’s artworks in the Budgeins Case

It is always challenging when works are presented unmounted and unframed and obviously the glass display cabinet restricts size and number. Lilly managed the restrictions and presented an interesting collection. However it was difficult to really see some of the works and I would have liked to see them framed and hung where they could be seen to advantage. The modest price tag means someone is going to take home a bargain. Go and see for yourself.

 

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